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Two Frogs
A group of frogs were traveling through the woods
when two of them fell into a deep pit.
When the other frogs saw how deep the pit was,
they told the two frogs that they were as good as
dead. The two frogs ignored the comments and
tried to jump up out of the pit with all their might.
The other frogs kept telling them to stop, that
they were as good as dead.
Finally, one of the frogs took heed to what the
other frogs were saying and gave up. He fell down
and died.
The other frog continued to jump as hard as he
could.
Once again, the crowd of frogs yelled at him to
stop the pain and just die but he just jumped
even harder and, finally, he made it out!
When he got out, the other frogs said to him, ¡°Did
you not hear us?¡±
The frog explained to them that he was deaf and,
¡°I thought you were encouraging me the entire
time.¡±
This story teaches two lessons:
1. There is power of life and death in the tongue.
An encouraging word to someone who is down
can lift them up and help them make it through
the day.
2. A destructive word to someone who is down
can be what it takes to kill them.
Be careful of what you say. Speak life to those
who cross your path.
The power of words is sometimes hard to under-
stand, but an encouraging word can go such a
long way. Anyone can speak words that tend to
rob another of the spirit to continue in difficult
times.
Special is the individual who will take the time to
encourage another.
~Author unknown~
The Reading Room
2015 November
Pg 5 - The Sunshine Express
Treasures From The Inbox
So ¡°just enough¡± I pray
¡°Just enough of what?¡± you might say
Just enough thankfulness gets me through
the day!
-Mandy Massy
Have a blessed Thanksgiving! -k (Karen Shafer
lives in and writes from Grand Junction, CO)
If you get email, you
get stuff. Sometimes
it is spam, sometimes
it is a true gem.
Here is one of those
gems worth sharing:
Positively Karen
The day before Thanksgiving Day at our house
was baking day. Mother baked - she baked
pumpkin pies, mincemeat pies, cakes (three
layer chocolate with cr¨¨me filling between lay-
ers), dinner rolls and fudge!!! The aroma of it
all was intoxicating.
Thanksgiving Day, extra leaves were inserted
into the dining table, chairs were added, white
linen was spread and Mother¡¯s best dishes laid
out. My parents and a good many adult guests
were seated around the dining room table. I
sat with the other children at the table in the
kitchen. My father carved the roasted turkey
that had been beheaded the day before. As the
day waned, good-bye was taken by all. Echoes
of laughter that rang out that day stay with me
still. Thanksgiving equals a ceremony of giving
thanks, a day of blessing, a day of worship, a
festival.
A young friend, Mandy Massy, expressed
thanksgiving so eloquently in a poem she wrote
recently entitled ¡®Just Enough¡¯. Mandy, her hus-
band Andrew and their eight wonderful children
reside on a ranch in the Unaweep, south west
of Grand Junction.
Just Enough
I fold my hands and bow my head to pray
Lord, I don¡¯t ask for much, just enough for
today
The water is getting low and things are tight
Somehow the children gotta learn to read and
write
Dirty dishes are piled in the sink
This pile of laundry is growing, I think
The kids are fighting and the baby is crying
Some days its hard to keep trying
There¡¯s buckets of canning waiting to be done
Hubby wants to know, ¡°Can you help me Hon?¡±
When life piles up deep and I begin to doubt
God always has a way of turning my eyes inside
out
Lack of water makes me look at rain with
delight
Think of the memories made by kids that fight
I¡¯m filled with joy when that baby smiles so
sweet
Dirty dishes are a blessing of plenty to eat
We have food to eat and clothes to wear
Makes me thankful for every job I must bear
While I have to teach the kids to read and add
I get to teach them about God and how to be
glad
I get to be with my man and appreciate his love
It all makes me truly thankful to the Lord above
Drinking From My Saucer
I¡¯ve never made a fortune,
and it¡¯s probably too late now.
But I don¡¯t worry about that much,
I¡¯m happy anyhow
And as I go along life¡¯s way,
I¡¯m reaping better than I sowed.
I¡¯m drinking from my saucer,
¡®Cause my cup has overflowed.
Haven¡¯t got a lot of riches,
and sometimes the going¡¯s tough
But I¡¯ve got loving ones all around me,
and that makes me rich enough.
I thank God for his Blessings,
and the Mercies He¡¯s bestowed.
I¡¯m drinking from my saucer,
¡®Cause my cup has overflowed.
I remember times when things went wrong,
My faith wore somewhat thin.
But all at once the dark clouds broke,
and the sun peeped through again.
So Lord, help me not to gripe,
about the tough rows I have hoed.
I¡¯m drinking from my saucer,
¡®Cause my cup has overflowed.
If God gives me strength and courage,
When the way grows steep and rough.
I¡¯ll not ask for other blessings,
I¡¯m already Blessed enough.
And may I never be too busy,
to help others bear their loads.
Then I¡¯ll keep drinking from my saucer,
¡®Cause my cup has overflowed.
THANKFULNESS
Awake, night deepens, cricket has ceased chirp-
ing. Drifting on the river of time. Remembering,
long ago a white house, with forest green win-
dow trim, that once stood in an elm grove on a
hill. Now paved (once graveled) road leads to the
past.
The year was 1947. Our family had moved from
Illinois to Colorado in spring of that year. Six
years of age I attended a small country school
just north of Denver.
Halloween had come and gone. Pictures of pump-
kins on the class room walls were replaced with
a Pilgrim panorama. By the end of November we
were well educated about the first Thanksgiving
Day in America. And we sang ¡°over the river and
through the woods¡± over and over and over!
A Poem Of Thanks
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¡°Happiness cannot be traveled
to, owned, earned, worn or con-
sumed. Happiness is the spiritual
experience of living every minute
with love, grace, and gratitude.¡±
- D. Waitley