background image
A fellow walked into a doctor¡¯s of-
fice and the receptionist asked him
what he had.
He said, ¡°Shingles.¡±
So she took down his name, ad-
dress, medical insurance number
and told him to have a seat.
A few minutes later a nurse¡¯s aid
came out and asked him what he
had.
He said, ¡°Shingles.¡±
So she took down his height,
weight, a complete medical history
and told him to wait in the examin-
ing room.
Ten minutes later a nurse came in
and asked him what he had.
He said, ¡°Shingles.¡±
So she gave him a blood test, a
blood pressure test, an electrocar-
diogram, told him to take off all his
clothes and wait for the doctor.
Fifteen minutes later the doctor
came in and asked him what he
had.
He said, ¡°Shingles.¡±
The doctor said, ¡°Where?¡±
He said, ¡°Outside in the truck.
Where do you want them?¡±
A SHORT HISTORY
OF MEDICINE:
¡°Doctor, I have an ear ache.¡±
2000 B.C. - ¡°Here, eat this root.¡±
1000 B.C. - ¡°That root is
heathen, say this prayer.¡±
1850 A.D. - ¡°That prayer is
superstition, drink this potion.¡±
1940 A.D. - ¡°That potion is
snake oil, swallow this pill.¡±
1985 A.D. - ¡°That pill is
ineffective, take this antibiotic.¡±
2000 A.D. - ¡°That antibiotic is
artificial. Here, eat this root!¡±
Don¡¯t Forget To Laugh
Long-term indoor air pollution can even lead to
the development of respiratory diseases and heart
disease.
How to improve indoor air quality
Everyday activities, such as cooking, cleaning,
showering, burning candles and drying clothes
contribute to polluted indoor air.
Pollutants coming from toxic materials, such
as plastic toys, synthetic furnishings, cleaning
solvents and building materials, can also worsen
indoor air quality.
Adding natural light and fresh air to your home
can help combat the dangers of modern indoor
living.
Here are seven smart steps homeowners can take
to make their living conditions healthier:
Vent air while cooking
Always remember to turn on the hood fan while
you¡¯re cooking and open nearby windows and
skylights.
Try cooking oils with higher smoke points, so you
produce fewer fumes.
Palm, peanut, grapeseed, avocado and sunflower
oils all have smoke points higher than 400 de-
grees Fahrenheit.
Install a skylight
Adding a skylights is a simple renovation project
that drastically improves your home¡¯s health.
One option is Velux No Leak Solar Powered Fresh
Air Skylights, which bring in natural light and open
to create fresh air flow.
The latest models come with a remote control to
open and close the skylight and its blinds. Learn
more at: whyskylights.com
Use natural air flow
Hot air rises and cool air stays closer to the
ground.
You can take advantage of this natural air ex-
change in your home by opening a skylight or
window higher in your home while also opening
one below it or on a lower level.
As fresh, cool air is pulled in, the warmer, polluted
air will escape at the top.
Avoid burning candles
Candles provide ambiance and often a pretty
scent, but they can have a negative effect on
indoor air quality.
Try opting for beeswax candles, which produce
fewer airborne toxins. Alternatively, check out
battery-operated candles that look close to the
real thing.
Clean regularly
Create a home and pet cleaning schedule, and
stick to it as much as possible.
Vacuuming can help eliminate dust and dander.
Dry clothes outside
When the weather is nice outside, take a cue from
your grandparents and dry clothes outside natu-
rally with the sunshine and breeze.
Eliminating use of the dryer or dryer sheets de-
creases air-polluting fumes and moisture buildup
in your home.
Plus, who doesn¡¯t love the smell of line-dried
clothing?
Make home airing a daily habit
Even if the weather only allows you to air out your
home for a few minutes, it can make a world of
difference.
Make a habit of opening windows and skylights
daily.
If you think you¡¯ll forget, just set an alarm on
your phone to remind you.
Health & Nurturing
2019 June/July
Pg 7 - The Sunshine Express
Recent Cannabis
Facts
** Marijuana Business Factbook estimates the legal-
marijuana industry¡¯s economic impact in the US was
$20-$23 billion in 2017. It estimates the economic im-
pact could reach as high as $77 billion by 2022.
Those numbers are comparable to the GDPs of Idaho
and West Virginia, which were both a tick over $77 bil-
lion in 2018, according to the Bureau of Economic Analy-
sis, and worth more than the GDP of nine states, includ-
ing Delaware, Alaska and both North and South Dakota.
** New Frontier Data, a cannabis market-research and
data-analysis firm, estimates that the US cannabis in-
dustry employs at least 250,000 people.
Those are just the jobs directly involved with handling
marijuana plants.
Compare that to the size of one of the staple blue-collar
industries, coal mining, which employed 52,300 in 2018.
** Another study estimated the marijuana industry
would grow to at least 330,000 jobs by 2022, a higher
number than the 268,000 employees at US steel and
iron mills.
The median salary in the marijuana industry was
$58,511 in 2018, while the median salary for US workers
as a whole was $52,863, according to Glassdoor data.
** Researchers at Colorado
State University-Pueblo found
that in 2016, the marijuana
industry had an economic
impact of $58 million in Pueblo
County.
Added costs from the industry,
like law enforcement and social
services, totaled $23 million.
So the county made $35 mil-
lion that year.
Pueblo County is home to
fewer than 200,000 residents.
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